Tag Archives: 2017

Serial Killer in Boston with Historical Tendencies

dying_breath

Vickie Preston survived an attack by a killer when she was in high school while babysitting. It was the first time she saw a ghost, but not the last. And it was her first encounter with Griffin Price, then a policeman.

On to present day, Griffin Price is now a Special Agent with the FBI unit known as the Krewe of Hunters. Griffin and his fellow agent Jackson are in Boston helping with the hunt for a serial killer known as The Undertaker.

Vickie, now a historian, becomes involved in the case when the killer mentions her by name in one of the notes sent to the police as clues to find the victims before their air runs out. Her vast knowledge of the history of Boston becomes a tool in the Hunters’ arsenal. And, she and Griffin meet again for the first time since that fateful night of her youth and are drawn together.

This is one of the best Krewe of Hunters novels that I’ve read. Heather Graham does a great job blending history and geography in the clues given to Vickie, Griffin, Jackson, and the police to solve. It makes the mystery even more fascinating. I was guessing at who the killer(s) were right up until the end.

Griffin and Vickie are both good characters. Vickie is a little more fleshed out than Griffin in that she has more details about her character in the book. As they work together to solve the mystery, they are drawn together as well. This leads to some sex scenes which are tastefully done. The mystery takes the forefront of the book. The romance is slightly secondary to it.

The paranormal mostly figures in with the ghosts of Dylan and Darlene. They are used as more as plot devices than people, but not overly so.

Overall, I give Dying Breath 4 out of 5 stars. It’s a well-written mystery with romance. I was guessing at who did it right up until the end.

Dying Breath by Heather Graham is #21 in the Krewe of Hunters series. It was released May 30, 2017 from MIRA.

My copy of the book was an ARC provided by the publisher through NetGalley. All opinions are my own and freely given.

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Review: Death Need Not Be Fatal

Death Need Not Be Fatal by Malachy McCourt with Brian McDonald is a memoir of sorts. It pulls from events in his life both tragic and humorous – sometimes both at the same time. And sometimes the humor only comes in retrospection.death_need_not_fatal

From the synopsis: “It seems the only two things he hasn’t done are stick his head into a lion’s mouth and die. Since he is allergic to cats, he decided to write about the great hereafter…”

I hadn’t read any of his previous books or his brother Frank’s books. So I wasn’t at all familiar with the subject matter he draws on most – their lives. You don’t need to have any familiarity with it though to enjoy the book and his stories.

As expected, much of the book focuses on deaths and how they have affected him. The last part of the book is something of a contemplation of his own death. He says, “Any day on this side of the grass is a good day.” And he talks about reading the “Irish Sporting Pages” – otherwise known as the obituaries. There’s more to it than that,

“I’ll try to keep the lies to a minimum, but I never let truth get in the way of a good story, and a lie is just a dream that might come true.” location 101 on my Kindle

So after a while, I wondered how much might be exaggeration. I decided to take most of it at face value.

Overall, it’s a good and interesting book. It has a conversational tone. It’s like he’s sitting there telling you the stories. I give it 4 stars out of 5.

Death Need Not Be Fatal was published May 16, 2017 by Center Street

Disclaimer: I received a copy of this book through NetGalley. My review is my own opinion and freely given.

 

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Sam Clair: Snarky Editor and Sleuth

cast_of_vulturesSam Clair is a mild-mannered book editor, girlfriend, daughter, friend, and reluctant sleuth. She has a wickedly sarcastic sense of humor that she doesn’t always express out loud, but we are privy to it in her thoughts as the story progresses.“(It is, tragically, still illegal to force people to buy books at gunpoint. I don’t know why this kind of restriction is allowed to remain on the statute books.)” – location 31 on my Kindle

Viv is one of Sam’s neighborhood friends. Viv’s friend and neighbor Dennis has gone missing. Logically this means that Sam and she must break into his apartment to see if this is a planned absence or perhaps something more sinister. After yet another in a series of neighborhood fires, Dennis is found, but there are many questions still.

Much goes into trying to solve the mystery of Dennis’s disappearance from her making phone calls to shadowing one shady character at the market for clues. And it would appear that someone isn’t that happy about her interference. Things escalate and Sam’s life is at stake.

I enjoyed reading this book. The characters were mostly well drawn and interesting. I read this as a stand-alone but probably would have gained something by reading it as part of the series. I loved Sam’s snark. And the mystery was well done. It builds slowly from the disappearance of Dennis to Sam’s life being in danger from all of her snooping. As the mystery deepens, it gains momentum. By the end, I was reading fast to find out what would happen next.

Overall I give this book 4 out of 5 stars. It’s well written with interesting characters. The mystery itself is well done. Don’t be put off by this being the third book in the series. This can be read as a stand-alone and enjoyed. Some depth to some of the characters could probably be gained though by reading earlier books in the series.

Disclaimer: I received a copy of this book in exchange for my honest opinion.

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History, Mystery, and a touch of Romance

fifthpetalThe story opens in Salem, Massachusetts Halloween 1989. A group of women is gathered together to consecrate the ground where the hangings of the accused witches in 1692 took place. Then suddenly they are attacked. There are 2 survivors. One is a 5-year-old young girl who was hidden by one of the women in some briars. The other is one of the women that the girl calls Auntie Rose aka Rose Whelan – the leader of the event.

Callie, the young girl, has no recollection of the event, but she has a scar on the palm of her hand in the shape of a rose from holding onto the rosary that Auntie Rose gave her so tightly while she was hidden. Rose appears to have lost her mind as a result of the attack and claims that it was a banshee that attacked and killed the young women collectively known as ‘The Goddesses.’

Salem, Massachusetts 2014, 25 years later to the day, Rose is again implicated in an attack. This time on a young boy – a bit of a hoodlum. There are no marks on his body, but she was present when he died. She claims the banshee did it again.

John Rafferty, chief of police of Salem, finds himself in a position where he believes that Rose had nothing to do with either incident. He decides he must reopen the cold case of The Goddesses’ murders.

Most of the book is from Callie’s point of view, but a fair amount is also from Rafferty’s point of view. Callie starts to have vivid dreams of what happened in the past and shares these with Rafferty. Meanwhile, Rafferty goes through legal channels and old evidence trying to solve the cold case while he waits for a cause of death of the boy.

It’s mostly Callie’s story. And she gets involved with local old families. One member of which is responsible for triggering some of her most vivid dreams.

There is history, mystery and a touch of romance in The Fifth Petal. I read the first book in this series, The Lace Reader, a while back. It was a good book, but not as good as The Fifth Petal. Brunonia Barry’s writing seems to have improved in the time between the two books. You can read The Fifth Petal without having read The Lace Reader and still enjoy it. Truthfully, I remembered little of the first book. Towner and Rafferty were both characters in the first book and have roles in this one as well – Rafferty a little more so than Towner.

There are some things that you might consider either paranormal or magical realism elements. There is the ability to see the future by reading lace that is mentioned. And there is the way that Towner, Callie, and some of the other people seem to know things before they happen or are said by people. There is Callie’s use of musical therapy for healing. And finally, there is the question of the banshee. Is she real?

Overall, it’s a good book. I give it 4 out of 5 stars. It’s well written. The mystery is good. The inclusion of the history is a plus. The author tells some of what is real vs pure fiction in the acknowledgments. I may have enjoyed it more because of the history in it. The 1692 events in Salem have always interested me. I would recommend the book to anyone who enjoys a good mystery with a few possibly paranormal elements and a touch of romance. If you like Salem and its history, then you will enjoy it even more.

The Fifth Petal was released January 24, 2017 from Crown.

Disclaimer: I received a copy of this book in exchange for my honest opinion.

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